Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

ALS — Jean-Pierre Julien

MDA awarded a grant totaling $345,000 to Jean-Pierre Julien, professor at Laval University, Canada, for research into genetic variations in a protein called chromogranin B (CHGB) that has been shown to modify disease risk and hasten onset in a type of familial ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease).

ALS — Michael Benatar

Michael Benatar, associate professor of neurology and epidemiology at Emory University in Atlanta, received an MDA grant totaling $525,000 to continue research into the early stage of FALS — familial, or inherited, ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease) — prior to symptom onset.

ALS — Oliver Hobert

MDA awarded $374,511 to Oliver Hobert, professor of biochemistry and molecular biophysics at Columbia University, New York, to study the function of the TDP43 gene, mutations in which can cause ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease).

ALS — Shanthini Sockanathan

MDA awarded a grant totaling $347,832 to Shanthini Sockanathan, associate professor of neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, for research into the molecular causes of nerve cell, or motor neuron, degeneration in diseases including ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease).

ALS — Stanley H. Appel

MDA awarded a research grant totaling $330,000 to Stanley H. Appel, chair of the department of neurology at the Methodist Neurological Institute (MNI) in Houston, to study the protective effects of a specific class of immune system cells in ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease).

ALS — Wilfried Rossoll

MDA awarded $358,653 to Wilfried Rossoll, assistant professor at Emory University in Atlanta, for research into the effects on nerve cells, or "motor neurons," of toxic TDP43 protein, implicated in ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease).

ALS — Brian Freibaum

MDA awarded $180,000 to research scientist Brian Freibaum at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., for research into the mechanism by which toxic TDP43 protein leads to the development and progression of some forms of ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease).

ALS — Junping Xin, Ph.D.

MDA has awarded a development grant totaling $180,000 over a period of three years to Junping Xin, research associate at the Neuroscience Institute, Loyola University Medical Center in Chicago, and Edward Hines Jr. Veterans Administration Hospital in Hines, Ill. The funds will help support Xin’s research into the possible effects of immune system dysfunction in ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease).

ALS — Youngjin Lee, Ph.D.

Youngjin Lee, postdoctoral associate in the department of neurology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore was awarded an MDA development grant totaling $179,997 over three years. The funds will support Lee's study of the role of a protein called MCT-1 in ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease).

ALS — Clotilde Lagier-Tourenne, M.D., Ph.D.

Clotilde Lagier-Tourenne, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, San Diego, in La Jolla, was awarded an MDA development grant totaling $180,000 over a period of three years to study the roles of two proteins, TDP43 and FUS, in ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease).

ALS-causing mutations in the genes for two RNA binding proteins, TDP43 and FUS, appear to cause disruption in the processing of RNA (the chemical step that directs protein synthesis).

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