Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

No Smoking Gun

A new meta-analysis combining data from 11 studies has found no connection between variations in genes for paraoxonase (PON) enzymes and an increased risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

Flood Volunteer With ALS

Six or seven days a week, eight or nine hours a day, Steve Thomas is a home wrecker.

Far from being a destroyer, Thomas, 62, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, is part of an important restoration process that he calls “gutting and mucking.”

Thomas is one of hundreds of volunteers helping to tear down thousands of Cedar Rapids homes ravaged by raging floodwaters last year, displacing more than 20,000 people. Volunteers tear down walls and rip up floors so the debris can be hauled off and the homes rebuilt.

Flood Volunteer with ALS

Six or seven days a week, eight or nine hours a day, Steve Thomas is a home wrecker.

Far from being a destroyer, Thomas, 62, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, is part of an important restoration process that he calls “gutting and mucking.”

Thomas is one of hundreds of volunteers helping to tear down thousands of Cedar Rapids homes ravaged by raging floodwaters last year, displacing more than 20,000 people. Volunteers tear down walls and rip up floors so the debris can be hauled off and the homes rebuilt.

ALS 'Lake Link' Tenuous

Recent media reports have raised the question of a possible link between an increased risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and living near Lake Mascoma in Western New Hampshire.

The Union Leader in New Hampshire and other news outlets have reported that the risk of developing ALS is 25 times higher than average for people living around Lake Mascoma, located in Enfield and Lebanon, N.H. The source of this statistic was not explained.

ALS 'Lake Link' Tenuous

Recent media reports have raised the question of a possible link between an increased risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and living near Lake Mascoma in Western New Hampshire.

The Union Leader in New Hampshire and other news outlets have reported that the risk of developing ALS is 25 times higher than average for people living around Lake Mascoma, located in Enfield and Lebanon, N.H. The source of this statistic was not explained.

ALS 'Lake Link' Tenuous

Recent media reports have raised the question of a possible link between an increased risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and living near Lake Mascoma in Western New Hampshire.

The Union Leader in New Hampshire and other news outlets have reported that the risk of developing ALS is 25 times higher than average for people living around Lake Mascoma, located in Enfield and Lebanon, N.H. The source of this statistic was not explained.

Holes in the Walls

Proteins that keep large molecules from moving freely across blood-vessel walls in the spinal cord appear to be deficient in people with ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), MDA-supported researchers say. They don't yet know, however, whether a lower-than-normal level of some of these so-called "tight junction" proteins, is helpful or harmful in the disease process.

Holes in the Walls

Proteins that keep large molecules from moving freely across blood-vessel walls in the spinal cord appear to be deficient in people with ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), MDA-supported researchers say. They don't yet know, however, whether a lower-than-normal level of some of these so-called "tight junction" proteins, is helpful or harmful in the disease process.

ALS Research: Survival Gene

A variant version of the gene for a protein known as KIFAP3 has been found to increase survival time in people with sporadic (nonfamilial) ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease) by an average of 14 months.

ALS Research: Survival Gene

A variant version of the gene for a protein known as KIFAP3 has been found to increase survival time in people with sporadic (nonfamilial) ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease) by an average of 14 months.

The findings of John Landers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, with colleagues from institutions around the world, was published online May 18, 2009, in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. MDA supported Orla Hardiman and Simon Cronin at the Royal College of Surgeons in Dublin, Ireland, for this work.

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