Quest Magazine

Stem Cells to Nerve Cells

Researchers at the Burnham Institute for Medical Research in La Jolla, Calif., and the University of California at Los Angeles, say they've developed immature nerve cells that are flexible enough to become multiple nervous-system cell types but committed enough not to become other types of cells or form tumors.

ALS: A Vicious Cycle

A vicious cycle in which damage to nerve cells (neurons) in the spinal cord results in the loss of an important mechanism to protect neurons, causing more neuron loss, has been identified as a possible contributor to ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis). Identification of this pathway opens the door to targeting it with therapeutic agents.

ALS: A Vicious Cycle

A vicious cycle in which damage to nerve cells (neurons) in the spinal cord results in the loss of an important mechanism to protect neurons, causing more neuron loss, has been identified as a possible contributor to ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis). Identification of this pathway opens the door to targeting it with therapeutic agents.

Biology Prize

On May 3, 2009, molecular biologist Louis Kunkel at Children's Hospital in Boston and Harvard University, and biophysicist Kevin Campbell at the University of Iowa, received the prestigious March of Dimes Prize in Developmental Biology. The prize includes a $250,000 cash award.

DMD: Restarting Muscle Development?

A protein called laminin 111 had a marked therapeutic effect in mice that lack the dystrophin protein and have a muscle disease resembling human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), say researchers at the University of Nevada School of Medicine.

Patching the Membrane

Scientists in the United States and Japan say they've identified a previously unknown but crucial step in a natural muscle-cell repair process that could have implications for the treatment of muscular dystrophies, particularly those in which membrane defects are implicated.

Master Woodworker with FSHD

“Let me tell you how serious he is about this woodworking hobby,” laughs Diana Taylor about her husband Dale.

“There’s a horse field across the road from our house. He drove his scooter over there and waited until he could get a close-up photo of a horse’s jaw and snout. Then he had the picture right in front of him when he went to re-create it in wood.”

Silencing Toxic Genes

A new gene therapy approach to "silencing" disease-causing genetic information has been developed by researchers at Rutgers University in Piscataway, N.J., and Integrated DNA Technologies in Coralville, Ia.

Silencing Toxic Genes

A new gene therapy approach to "silencing" disease-causing genetic information has been developed by researchers at Rutgers University in Piscataway, N.J., and Integrated DNA Technologies in Coralville, Ia.

Plugging a Leak

Investigators conducting experiments in mice with a disease resembling Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) believe they’ve uncovered a new strategy to protect against muscle damage and improve strength in this disease.

Andrew Marks at Columbia University in New York coordinated the team, which included researchers from Montpellier (France) University and other institutions in Montpellier. They published their findings in the March issue of Nature Medicine.

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