Quest Magazine

Iplex Shows Limited Benefit in MMD1

The drug Iplex, developed by the Richmond, Va., biopharmaceutical company Insmed, did not improve muscle function, strength or endurance in a phase 2 trial in type 1 myotonic dystrophy (MMD1, or DM1), the company announced June 25, 2009. (See Insmed Announces Results.)

MMD: Insmed Announces Results

RICHMOND, VA., June 25, 2009 - Insmed Inc. (NASDAQ CM: INSM), a biopharmaceutical company, today announced results from its exploratory U.S. Phase II clinical trial evaluating IPLEX™ (mecasermin rinfabate) in patients with myotonic muscular dystrophy (“MMD”).  The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase II trial conducted in 13 centers across the U.S.

MD Research: 3-Protein Repair Cluster

Scientists in the United States and Japan have identified a three-protein cluster that reseals damaged muscle-fiber membranes. The findings, published June 5, 2009, in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, could have implications for development of treatments for muscular dystrophies.

ALS 'Lake Link' Tenuous

Recent media reports have raised the question of a possible link between an increased risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and living near Lake Mascoma in Western New Hampshire.

The Union Leader in New Hampshire and other news outlets have reported that the risk of developing ALS is 25 times higher than average for people living around Lake Mascoma, located in Enfield and Lebanon, N.H. The source of this statistic was not explained.

Three-Protein Repair Cluster Identified

Scientists in the United States and Japan have identified a three-protein cluster that reseals damaged muscle-fiber membranes. The findings, published June 5, 2009, in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, could have implications for development of treatments for muscular dystrophies.




ALS 'Lake Link' Tenuous

Recent media reports have raised the question of a possible link between an increased risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and living near Lake Mascoma in Western New Hampshire.

The Union Leader in New Hampshire and other news outlets have reported that the risk of developing ALS is 25 times higher than average for people living around Lake Mascoma, located in Enfield and Lebanon, N.H. The source of this statistic was not explained.

NM Research: Successful Substitute?

A protein present in skeletal muscles during fetal development and in the heart after birth can apparently compensate for a similar protein that's missing in a small percentage of patients with the muscle disease known as nemaline myopathy.

MDA research grantee Nigel Laing at the University of Western Australia in Perth was part of a multinational team of scientists, who published their findings May 25, 2009, in the Journal of Cell Biology.

MD Research: Muscle-Repair Booster

In experiments in mice, Michael Rudnicki, an MDA grantee at the Sprott Center for Stem Cell Research at Ottawa Hospital Research Institute (OHRI), and colleagues, found the WNT7a protein stimulates muscle repair by causing proliferation (an increase in number) of "satellite stem cells." They say the protein probably operates similarly in humans. The findings were published June 5, 2009, in the journal Cell Stem Cell.

Cardiac Actin Can Substitute for Skeletal-Muscle Actin

A protein present in skeletal muscles during fetal development and in the heart after birth can apparently compensate for a similar protein that's missing in a small percentage of patients with the muscle disease known as nemaline myopathy.

MDA research grantee Nigel Laing at the University of Western Australia in Perth was part of a multinational team of scientists, who published their findings May 25, 2009, in the Journal of Cell Biology.

WNT7a Protein Boosts Muscle Repair

In experiments in mice, Michael Rudnicki, an MDA grantee at the Sprott Center for Stem Cell Research at Ottawa Hospital Research Institute (OHRI), and colleagues, found the WNT7a protein stimulates muscle repair by causing proliferation (an increase in number) of "satellite stem cells." They say the protein probably operates similarly in humans. The findings were published June 5, 2009, in the journal Cell Stem Cell.

Pages