Periodic Paralysis

Periodic Paralysis Conference Connects Experts, Families

The 2011 Periodic Paralysis Association Conference will be held Nov. 4-6 in Orlando, Fla., and is geared toward people with periodic paralysis (PP), their families, physicians and friends.

This is not an MDA meeting, but several current and former MDA research grantees will be speaking. Among them are:

Research Briefs: FA, MG, MM, MMD1, gene therapy

Edison drugs target FA, mitochondrial diseases

Overview

What are inherited and endocrine myopathies?

Muscles affected by inherited and endocrine myopathies
Myopathies can cause weakness or stiffness in all of the body's voluntary muscles. Because muscles support the body's posture, muscle weakness can lead to skeletal deformities.

Inherited and Endocrine Myopathies

Description: 

MDA leads the search for treatments and therapies for inherited and endocrine myopathies. The Association also provides comprehensive supports and expert clinical care for those living with inherited and endocrine myopathies.

In this section, you’ll find up-to-date information about inherited and endocrine myopathies, as well as many helpful resources. This information has been compiled with input from researchers, physicians and people affected by the disease.

Researchers Exploring Disability Perceptions

Researchers at the Psychology of Disability Lab at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor are exploring the social identity of people with disabilities through a short, anonymous, Web-based questionnaire.

The lab's Disability Identity Project is being headed by principal investigator Adena Rottenstein, a doctoral candidate in psychology.

The study closes the week of Aug. 22, 2011.

Potassium Channel Mutations Underlie TPP

The rare condition thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis, or TPP, causes people with normal muscle strength to experience episodes of paralysis and weakness. Until recently, TPP was known to be associated with attacks of high thyroid hormone secretion (thyrotoxicosis), but new information shows that in some cases the condition also has a genetic component -- mutations in a newly identified potassium channel that helps control the flow of potassium ions into and out of muscle fibers.

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