Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy (OPMD)

Research Briefs: FA, MG, MM, MMD1, gene therapy

Edison drugs target FA, mitochondrial diseases

Researchers Exploring Disability Perceptions

Researchers at the Psychology of Disability Lab at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor are exploring the social identity of people with disabilities through a short, anonymous, Web-based questionnaire.

The lab's Disability Identity Project is being headed by principal investigator Adena Rottenstein, a doctoral candidate in psychology.

The study closes the week of Aug. 22, 2011.

Research Briefs: BMD, DMD, EDMD, FA, LGMD, OPMD, Pompe disease, SMA

Idebenone may help maintain respiratory function in DMD

Santhera Pharmaceuticals announced May 9, 2011, that its drug Catena (generic name idebenone) appears to slow the decline in respiratory function associated with aging in people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Idebenone may improve energy production in muscle and nerve cells.

Study Seeks People With Uncertain MD Diagnoses

A study to determine the early features of late-onset Pompe disease (acid maltase deficiency) is seeking 250 adults who have a clinical diagnosis of unclassified limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD), an uncertain diagnosis of other forms of muscular dystrophy (MD),or an unclassified myopathy(muscle disease)who do not carry any biochemical, metabolic, enzymatic, serologic (blood), molecular or pathologic diagnostic marker that confirms their diagnosis.

OPMD: Cystamine Strengthens Muscles in Mice

Scientists in the United Kingdom have found that mice carrying a genetic mutation that causes oculpharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) in humans and showing a disease resembling human OPMD benefited from treatment with a chemical called cystamine, provided in their drinking water.

About the new findings

David Rubinsztein and colleagues at the University of Cambridge announced their findings June 2, 2010, in Science Translational Medicine.

OPMD: Toxic Clumps Not the Only Cause?

 New findings strongly suggest that oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) can't be explained solely on the basis of the formation of potentially toxic protein clumps in muscle cells. The loss of function of a protein known as PABPN1 appears to be a likely factor in this disease as well.

The findings may lead to new therapeutic strategies.

About the new findings

Three-Protein Repair Cluster Identified

Scientists in the United States and Japan have identified a three-protein cluster that reseals damaged muscle-fiber membranes. The findings, published June 5, 2009, in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, could have implications for development of treatments for muscular dystrophies.




MD Research: Muscle-Repair Booster

In experiments in mice, Michael Rudnicki, an MDA grantee at the Sprott Center for Stem Cell Research at Ottawa Hospital Research Institute (OHRI), and colleagues, found the WNT7a protein stimulates muscle repair by causing proliferation (an increase in number) of "satellite stem cells." They say the protein probably operates similarly in humans. The findings were published June 5, 2009, in the journal Cell Stem Cell.

Silencing Toxic Genes

A new gene therapy approach to "silencing" disease-causing genetic information has been developed by researchers at Rutgers University in Piscataway, N.J., and Integrated DNA Technologies in Coralville, Ia.

Possible New Therapy for OPMD?

Scientists in France and the Netherlands recently announced they've identified a promising new strategy that could potentially become a therapy for oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD), a form of MD that primarily weakens the eyelid and throat muscles and also can affect muscles in the limbs.

The strategy involves using an antibody (immune-system protein) derived from llamas. The antibody sticks to abnormally formed protein molecules in muscle cells and keeps them from forming large, damaging clumps.

Pages