Inclusion-Body Myositis (IBM)

William Titus

Location

Watchung, NJ

William was a licensed surveyor and founded his own surveying business. Upon his retirement in 1995, he began painting. His subjects were “vintage Watchung sites,” and many of his paintings are on display at the Watchung Police Station. This artwork recalls William and his teenage friends sledding on Hillcrest Road in Watchung around 1949. This artwork was featured in the MDA 2003 Holiday Wishes card collection.

Full name: 
William Titus
Artist: 
William Titus
Medium: 
Oil

Frank Bare

Location

Mesquite, NV

Frank began painting ceramics in 1989 and then expanded into acrylics on canvas. He received both bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Illinois, where he competed in gymnastics and received many NCAA awards. Frank served as the Executive Director of the U.S. Gymnastics Federation for many years and currently serves as the chairman of the Board for the International Hall of Fame.

Full name: 
Frank Bare
Artist: 
Frank Bare
Medium: 
Acrylic

Mike Shirk

Location

San Diego, CA

Mike spent 40 years as an advertising copy writer. His hobbies included hiking and distance running. In 2000, Mike began painting, and as a watercolorist, he revisits the outdoor landscapes he loves, but with a brush and palette instead of hiking boots and sneakers. He is a member of the San Diego Watercolor Society.

Full name: 
Mike Shirk
Artist: 
Mike Shirk
Medium: 
Watercolor

Clinical Trials

About clinical trials

A clinical trial is a test in humans of an experimental medication or therapy. Clinical trials are experiments, not treatments, and participation requires careful consideration.

Although it's possible to benefit from participating in a clinical trial, it's also possible that no benefit — or even harm — may occur. Keep your MDA clinic doctor informed about any clinical trial participation. (Note that MDA has no ability to influence who is chosen to participate in a clinical trial.)

Research

Researchers supported by MDA are studying the underlying mechanisms that cause inflammatory myopathies, the group of diseases to which inclusion-body myositis (IBM) belongs.

One research team studying the mechanisms of muscle destruction in IBM-affected muscle fibers is building on recent observations that two proteins are abnormally elevated in these fibers. One is called myostatin, which limits muscle growth; and the other is called NF kappa B, which is known to play a role in inflammation.

Medical Management

Treatment with drugs that suppress the immune system has been tried in inclusion-body myositis (IBM) but in general hasn’t been effective. Some physicians may try corticosteroids or other medications that alter the immune response if the patient wishes this treatment, but many feel that side effects outweigh any subtle benefits that might occur with these drugs in IBM.

Causes/Inheritance

What causes inclusion-body myositis (IBM)?

In most cases, the cause of IBM is unclear. For some reason, the body’s immune system turns against its own muscles and damages muscle tissue in an autoimmune process.

Viruses might be a trigger for autoimmune myositis. People with the HIV virus, which causes AIDS, can develop a myositis, as can people with a virus called HTLV-1. Some myositis cases have followed infection with the Coxsackie B virus.

Diagnosis

As with other muscle diseases, a doctor diagnoses inclusion-body myositis (IBM) by considering the individual’s personal history, family medical history and the results of a careful physical examination. This may be followed by some lab tests, perhaps of the electrical activity inside the muscles. Usually, a muscle biopsy is ordered.

Signs and Symptoms

Inclusion-body myositis (IBM) primarily affects men, although women can be affected. It occurs mainly in those older than 50.

IBM usually begins with the gradual onset of slowly progressive weakness in the muscles of the wrists and fingers, and those at the front of the thigh (quadriceps). The muscles that lift the front of the foot also may be affected. The weakness may not be the same on both sides of the body.

Overview

What is inclusion-body myositis (IBM)?

Muscles affected in IBM
The first muscles affected in inclusion-body myositis are usually those of the wrists and fingers, and the muscles at the front of the thigh. The muscles that lift the front of the foot also may be affected.

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