Inclusion-Body Myositis (IBM)

Survey for People with IBM Reports Early Findings

Investigators conducting an online survey launched in January 2013 to gather anonymous information from people with inclusion-body myositis (IBM) are now reporting preliminary results and are asking the original respondents to complete a short supplementary survey.

BMD, IBM: Outcome Measures Study Seeks Participants

A study to determine the best outcome measures — ways to evaluate the effects of a treatment — for use in clinical studies in Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) and sporadic (nongenetic) inclusion-body myositis (sIBM) is underway at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, under the supervision of neurologist Jerry Mendell working with physical therapists Linda Lowes and

BMD, IBM: Preliminary Findings in Follistatin Gene Transfer Study Promising

Preliminary results from a trial to test the safety of injecting follistatin genes into the thigh muscles of adults with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD)or sporadic (nongenetic) inclusion-body myositis (sIBM) suggest that the experimental therapeutic approach is safe in both types of patients

IBM: Novartis Drug Gets Breakthrough Therapy Designation from FDA

Multinational pharmaceutical company Novartis has received breakthrough therapy designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for BYM338, an experimental drug it is developing to treat sporadic inclusion-body myositis (IBM).

‘Focused, Intense’ MDA Conference Advances Neuromuscular Disease Research

Turning neuromuscular disease research into treatments as quickly and effectively as possible was the overarching theme of dozens of formal presentations, nearly 200 scientific posters, and countless informal conversations at the MDA Scientific Conference, April 21-24.

A palpable sense of excitement pervaded the sold-out event thanks to the unprecedented number of experimental treatments in clinical trials for neuromuscular diseases, and the unique opportunity the conference provided for information-sharing and collaboration among scientific professionals from many disciplines.

New Guidelines on Genetic Testing in Children

As scientists learn more about what our DNA can tell us about health and disease, public interest has intensified and genetic testing has become increasingly common. In response, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) have released new guidelines to address updated technologies and new uses of genetic testing and screening in children.

$13.6 Million in New MDA Grants Promote Understanding, Treatment of Neuromuscular Diseases

The Muscular Dystrophy Association has awarded 44 new grants totaling $13.6 million to advance the understanding and treatment of neuromuscular diseases. The new grants, most of which took effect Feb. 1, encompass a range of diseases covered by MDA’s research program, and they support innovative approaches to basic research and new drug development.

In addition to addressing 16 specific neuromuscular diseases under MDA’s umbrella, the grants also fund research into muscular dystrophy in general, and research into muscle physiology related to neuromuscular disease.

ALS, IBM — Eric Ross, Ph.D.

Eric Ross, associate professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, was awarded an MDA research grant totaling $363,000 over a period of three years to study proteins whose aggregation causes neurodegeneration.

ALS, IBM — Hong Joo Kim, Ph.D.

Hong Joo Kim, a postdoctoral fellow at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., was awarded an MDA development grant totaling $180,000 over a period of three years to study new genes for a newly recognized disorder called multisystem proteinopathy (MSP).

ALS, IBM — Benoit Coulombe, Ph.D.

Benoit Coulombe, director of the Proteomics and Gene Transcription Laboratory at the University of Montréal in Quebec, Canada, was awarded an MDA research grant totaling $377,067 over a period of three years to study the regulation of a protein whose gene, when mutated, can cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and inclusion-body myositis (IBM).

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