Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSH or FSHD)

Laid-Off Newsman with FSHD Starts Second Career

Peter Callas Jr. remembers as if it were yesterday the day his father gave him “the F.D.R. talk.”

It was 1973, and Peter Jr., then 13 years old, had just been diagnosed with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD).

MDA Awards Two New FSHD Grants

MDA has awarded two grants for research aimed at determining the precise molecular causes of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD), and developing therapies for the disease.

MDA and Friends of FSH Research (FFSHR) based in Kirkland, Wash., will jointly fund a two-year, $200,000 grant to Joel Chamberlain, an assistant professor of medical genetics at the University of Washington in Seattle.

Disrupted Disease Process

A compound that has the potential to be refined and modified into a treatment for type 1 myotonic dystrophy (MMD1, or DM1) has been identified by researchers at the University of Oregon in Eugene, and the University of Rochester (N.Y.) School of Medicine and Dentistry.

FSHD: Abnormal Activation

An MDA-supported team of scientists in the United States and the Netherlands has uncovered new leads about the origins of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), a disease whose biochemical underpinnings have proved elusive to scientists despite years of investigation.

Abnormal Activation

An MDA-supported team of scientists in the United States and the Netherlands has uncovered new leads about the origins of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), a disease whose biochemical underpinnings have proved elusive to scientists despite years of investigation.

Lack of understanding of the mechanisms involved in FSHD has impeded treatment development, a phase of research that generally moves forward after disease mechanisms have been described.

Three-Protein Repair Cluster Identified

Scientists in the United States and Japan have identified a three-protein cluster that reseals damaged muscle-fiber membranes. The findings, published June 5, 2009, in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, could have implications for development of treatments for muscular dystrophies.




MD Research: Muscle-Repair Booster

In experiments in mice, Michael Rudnicki, an MDA grantee at the Sprott Center for Stem Cell Research at Ottawa Hospital Research Institute (OHRI), and colleagues, found the WNT7a protein stimulates muscle repair by causing proliferation (an increase in number) of "satellite stem cells." They say the protein probably operates similarly in humans. The findings were published June 5, 2009, in the journal Cell Stem Cell.

Silencing Toxic Genes

A new gene therapy approach to "silencing" disease-causing genetic information has been developed by researchers at Rutgers University in Piscataway, N.J., and Integrated DNA Technologies in Coralville, Ia.

Adaptive Skier with FSH

Learning that Gregg Kuersteiner snow-skis black diamond (expert) slopes at high speed doesn’t seem unusual until you see the rig he skis on.

Kuersteiner, 47, began skiing at age 2 every weekend of the season in his native upstate New York, under the tutelage of his father, a ski school instructor. He became an expert skier at an early age, and raced on the giant slalom team in high school.

Flying High ... From a Wheelchair

Flying automobiles … flying lawnmowers … flying doghouses … where’s this madness going to end?

If Chris “Lucky” Carnes has his druthers, the sky’s the limit.

For the past four years, the 33-year-old from Chase City, Va., has been busy practically every weekend with the rapidly growing hobby/sport of model aviation.

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